DuProprio has reinvented the way people sell and buy properties in Canada. A leader in real estate sales with no middleman, the company has always used digital technology to disrupt its sector. Over the years, more than 260,000 Canadians have used DuProprio’s services to sell their properties with no commissions, and millions of people visit their site each month.  
They are large (up to 3 cm), fast-flying bees, distinguished from the closely related genus Epicharis by the absence of long, whip-like setae that project backwards from just behind the eyes. They are commonly encountered bees in American deserts, and are active at very high ambient temperatures when many other species are in hiding. They can often be seen in large numbers on desert-willow (Chilopsis) and palo verde (Parkinsonia) blossoms. Bees of this genus are of some economical significance in pollinating crops such as Brazil Nut (Bertholletia excelsa) and Cashew (Anacardium occidentale, pollinated by C. tarsata among others).

Initially, the DuProprio application only featured properties for sale in a list, as it was not possible for a library to display Google Maps in a mobile app in 2009. In order to create what is now a commonplace experience for users, our team developed a custom MapKit based on Google Maps Web to display the tiles of the map. We also had to add our own implementation of touch handling and native positioning of properties, because internet performance on mobile devices was terrible at the time. This shows how incredible technological challenges are sometimes hidden behind the simplest user experiences.


Four varieties of bacteria have been found in the bee bread of the larva: Bacillus circulans, B. coagulans, B. firmus, and B. megaterium. Only the Bacillus genus has been found in the samples taken. Together, these four species were able to hydrolyze starch, ferment glucose, convert nitrates to nitrites, and produce dihydroxyacetone from glycerol. This group of bacteria also lowers the pH of the bee bread. These functions serve not only to protect the larva from other bacteria, but they also digest complex molecules which allow the larva to easily absorb nutrients without expending a lot of energy. The bacteria, in turn, receive a supply of food which results in a mutualistic relationship.[13]
Male C. pallida are able detect the pheromones which females release and use them to locate female burrows. When a virgin female is about to emerge from her burrow, she releases a scent that wafts up through the soil and is detected by the antenna of the males. This has led to males developing a very acute olfactory sense. Freshly-killed females have been buried to test whether sound also plays a part in male signaling. In these tests, male bees still dug up the dead females, proving that pheromone signaling is the only pathway. Males have also been observed to dig up other males. This shows that males and virgin females give off similar pheromones. Oddly, males also sometimes dig up other digger bee species. It is currently unknown why this occurs.[6]
Le patrimoine architectural de Québec comprend l'ensemble des bâtiments de l'Assemblée nationale qui ont été érigés sur la colline Parlementaire à partir de 1877. On y retrouve deux styles architecturaux, soit le style Second Empire pour l'Hôtel du Parlement et l'architecture Beaux-Arts pour les autres édifices. La Citadelle de Québec, construite entre 1820 et 1831, le Château Frontenac, bâti entre 1892 et 1893, et la Terrasse Dufferin font également partie du site patrimonial du Vieux-Québec.
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