Collaboration is of the utmost importance at Centris. It takes shape with our team, with our real estate clients, and with our valued partners from Québec and elsewhere, with whom we design approximately 50% of our tools. We encourage the pooling of talent to develop innovative solutions for real estate professionals and adapt tools based on a particular geographical context. At Centris, we see big and we see far: partnerships are essential to our progress.


Cette maison unifamiliale présente un design extérieur hors du commun avec un garage. Au rez-de chaussée, vous découvrirez une grande aire commune avec beaucoup de rangement dont un garde-manger de type « walk-in ». À l’étage, vous retrouverez trois chambres et une salle de bain spacieuse avec une douche de verre 3’ x 4’. N’hésitez pas à communiquer avec nous pour plus d’informations.
Four varieties of bacteria have been found in the bee bread of the larva: Bacillus circulans, B. coagulans, B. firmus, and B. megaterium. Only the Bacillus genus has been found in the samples taken. Together, these four species were able to hydrolyze starch, ferment glucose, convert nitrates to nitrites, and produce dihydroxyacetone from glycerol. This group of bacteria also lowers the pH of the bee bread. These functions serve not only to protect the larva from other bacteria, but they also digest complex molecules which allow the larva to easily absorb nutrients without expending a lot of energy. The bacteria, in turn, receive a supply of food which results in a mutualistic relationship.[13]
Outre les effets conjoncturels, les caractéristiques propres d'un bien immobilier ont une influence sur son prix. Celles-ci peuvent être intrinsèques au bien (facilité d'accès et d'aménagement, confort, isolation, exposition, esthétique, vétusté, charges et contraintes, bien occupé ou librement habitable), des éléments sentimentaux (biens de famille). Des phénomènes de rareté peuvent éventuellement être créés par des contraintes administratives de construction8.
Centris pallida is a species of solitary bee native to North America. It lacks an accepted common name; however, it has been called the digger bee, the desert bee, and the pallid bee due to its actions, habitat, and color respectively. The solitary nature of this bee allows for a dual-strategy mating system which produces an evolutionarily stable state resistant to invading strategies. These bees have also evolved to withstand the high temperatures of their native habitat. C. pallida routinely has internal temperatures within 3 degrees Celsius of death.
«J’ai utilisé votre site pour la première fois et j‘ai vendu avec succès ma propriété. vous offrez un outill indispensable et un service remarquable pour vendre sa propriété. ... C'est GRATUIT très facile à utiliser, et contrairement à Kiiji qui est un site qui accepte tous les types d’annonces, votre siteest totalement spécialisé en immobilier. » Ann - Saint-Prime

Male C. pallida are able detect the pheromones which females release and use them to locate female burrows. When a virgin female is about to emerge from her burrow, she releases a scent that wafts up through the soil and is detected by the antenna of the males. This has led to males developing a very acute olfactory sense. Freshly-killed females have been buried to test whether sound also plays a part in male signaling. In these tests, male bees still dug up the dead females, proving that pheromone signaling is the only pathway. Males have also been observed to dig up other males. This shows that males and virgin females give off similar pheromones. Oddly, males also sometimes dig up other digger bee species. It is currently unknown why this occurs.[6]
Centris pallida was officially discovered and catalogued by William J. Fox in 1899 near Phoenix, Arizona.[1] Fox also discovered Centris cockerelli, Centris errans, and Sphex subhyalinus. This species is closely related to Centris cockerelli in terms of habitat and genus, but is different in terms of mating, color, and subgenus.[2] This bee also belongs to the superfamily Apoidea, and the subfamily Apinae.[1]

A broker provides a complete and accurate description of the property, performs a comparative market analysis, proposes a marketing strategy, verifies the specifications of the desired property, prepares and submits the promise to purchase to the seller, negotiates in the best interest of his or her client, and ensures that all conditions are met on time for the signing of the notarial act.
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