Centris pallida was officially discovered and catalogued by William J. Fox in 1899 near Phoenix, Arizona.[1] Fox also discovered Centris cockerelli, Centris errans, and Sphex subhyalinus. This species is closely related to Centris cockerelli in terms of habitat and genus, but is different in terms of mating, color, and subgenus.[2] This bee also belongs to the superfamily Apoidea, and the subfamily Apinae.[1]
The two categories of behavior for C. pallida males are patrolling and hovering. These strategies are also used to find mates. In one category (the patrollers), male bees will patrol 3–6 centimeters above the ground in search of sites where buried virgin females will emerge. When a male bee finds such a site, he will dig 1–2 centimeters through the soil by gnawing at the surface with his jaws and using his forelegs to remove dirt from the excavation. If a female is found, he will attempt to mate with her either on the surface or at a nearby flower or tree. Other patrollers will sometimes attempt to steal a digging spot that another bee has found. If a bee has already found a female, another patroller bee may separate the male from the female so that it can copulate with the virgin. More often than not, the female (once found) will mate with either the male that found her or with an intruder.[6]
Collaboration is of the utmost importance at Centris. It takes shape with our team, with our real estate clients, and with our valued partners from Québec and elsewhere, with whom we design approximately 50% of our tools. We encourage the pooling of talent to develop innovative solutions for real estate professionals and adapt tools based on a particular geographical context. At Centris, we see big and we see far: partnerships are essential to our progress.
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The other category of behavior (the hoverers) uses a very different strategy that relies on the inherent limitations of the patroller strategy. Females won't have copulated with a patroller if they weren't found before emerging, or if they departed while the male that found them was fighting off a rival. The hoverers will wait either near plants that are close to emergence areas, regardless of whether the plants are flowering, or at flowering trees and shrubs well away from the emergence areas. These bees will hover anywhere from a few centimeters to eight meters in the air. Since patrollers are generally looking at the ground to find emergence areas, hoverers have less competition over escaped females. Those that are close to the emergence areas are able to quickly spot any females that got away from the patrollers. Male bees that are away from emergence areas stake out flowering plants in the hope that virgin females will arrive seeking food. Also, low-emergence areas are less likely to be patrolled, and thus, more females emerge without copulating.[9]
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À l’origine appelée directduproprio, l’entreprise est devenue DuProprio.com en 2004 puis DuProprio en 2011. En 2009, elle a procédé à l’acquisition de Private Real Estate, SKhomes4sale et ComFree3, d’autres entreprises canadiennes œuvrant également dans le domaine de la vente immobilière sans commission. Une fois la fusion de ces différentes entités complétée, la charte graphique de DuProprio est revue4.
This bee is black and densely covered in a grey pubescence or fur on the dorsal side. The thorax fur has a slightly yellow color. The legs have a mixture of black and reddish fur. The ventral side of the bee is covered in a brownish or dark yellow fur. The wings are fairly transparent except for the black veins that run through them. Males and females are similar in size at about 16–17 millimeters. Males have eyes more yellow in color, and their thorax fur is lighter. Females have eyes more green in color, and their thorax fur is more brown than grey.[3]
Your broker will help you fill in the seller’s declaration, prepare and explain all of the clauses in the promise to purchase, and help organize all the documents you need for the signing at the notary’s office. Your broker will also inform you of the steps to take to buy or sell a home and can guide you to competent professionals who you may need to consult with.
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