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« DuProprio ne donne pas l'encadrement complet de protection du consommateur, a soutenu Carole Poirier, candidate du PQ dans Hochelaga-Maisonneuve. La Loi sur le courtage a mis en place un encadrement. Mais certains ont réussi à se faufiler à l'extérieur des mailles de cette loi. Il va falloir faire en sorte de protéger le consommateur, l'acheteur et aussi le vendeur. La révision de cette loi est absolument nécessaire. »
Collaboration is of the utmost importance at Centris. It takes shape with our team, with our real estate clients, and with our valued partners from Québec and elsewhere, with whom we design approximately 50% of our tools. We encourage the pooling of talent to develop innovative solutions for real estate professionals and adapt tools based on a particular geographical context. At Centris, we see big and we see far: partnerships are essential to our progress.
En entrevue après le débat, la députée sortante a dit ne pas vouloir interdire les activités de DuProprio. Questionnée pour savoir quelles mesures concrètes un gouvernement du PQ mettrait en place à cet égard, Mme Poirier a parlé d'une campagne de publicité expliquant clairement les différentes protections offertes aux consommateurs quand ceux-ci font affaire tantôt avec un courtier, tantôt avec DuProprio.
The two categories of behavior for C. pallida males are patrolling and hovering. These strategies are also used to find mates. In one category (the patrollers), male bees will patrol 3–6 centimeters above the ground in search of sites where buried virgin females will emerge. When a male bee finds such a site, he will dig 1–2 centimeters through the soil by gnawing at the surface with his jaws and using his forelegs to remove dirt from the excavation. If a female is found, he will attempt to mate with her either on the surface or at a nearby flower or tree. Other patrollers will sometimes attempt to steal a digging spot that another bee has found. If a bee has already found a female, another patroller bee may separate the male from the female so that it can copulate with the virgin. More often than not, the female (once found) will mate with either the male that found her or with an intruder.[6]
Larger females are able to better control the size of their offspring. As stated in the Life Cycle section, more bee bread leads to larger offspring. Larger females are able to gather more pollen and nectar in a shorter amount of time when compared to smaller females. This means that during rich conditions, the larger females can have larger offspring with greater fitness, or if conditions are poor, the females can simply choose to have smaller offspring. There is a lower limit to how small offspring can be, and thus, smaller females can’t make this reduction or increase in size in response to the environment. Smaller females are still able to exist since larger females can’t take advantage of having larger offspring when the density of nesting grounds is low.[12] To put it another way, larger male offspring are less effective in low density nesting grounds since they don’t have as many opportunities to use their size to fight off other males; thus, in low density nesting grounds, small and large males have similar fitness which means that the extra bee bread which the larger male received served no purpose. Smaller males actually do better in low density areas because they don’t have to fight with larger males as much, and by extension, expend less energy. This lack of a reason to produce larger offspring reduces the fitness of the larger females since they have to dig larger tunnels to fit in, but still produce the same size offspring as smaller females.[12]

“The number of condominiums for sale in the Greater Montréal area fell by about 22% in May. A drop like this has not been seen in nearly 15 years,” said Mathieu Cousineau, President of the GMREB Board of Directors. “With strong demand and a decrease in supply, as we have been seeing for several months now, the condominium segment – against all expectations – is on the verge of moving into a seller’s market too,” added Mr. Cousineau.

Larger females are able to better control the size of their offspring. As stated in the Life Cycle section, more bee bread leads to larger offspring. Larger females are able to gather more pollen and nectar in a shorter amount of time when compared to smaller females. This means that during rich conditions, the larger females can have larger offspring with greater fitness, or if conditions are poor, the females can simply choose to have smaller offspring. There is a lower limit to how small offspring can be, and thus, smaller females can’t make this reduction or increase in size in response to the environment. Smaller females are still able to exist since larger females can’t take advantage of having larger offspring when the density of nesting grounds is low.[12] To put it another way, larger male offspring are less effective in low density nesting grounds since they don’t have as many opportunities to use their size to fight off other males; thus, in low density nesting grounds, small and large males have similar fitness which means that the extra bee bread which the larger male received served no purpose. Smaller males actually do better in low density areas because they don’t have to fight with larger males as much, and by extension, expend less energy. This lack of a reason to produce larger offspring reduces the fitness of the larger females since they have to dig larger tunnels to fit in, but still produce the same size offspring as smaller females.[12]
There is a size correlation which determines whether males become patrollers or hoverers. Patrollers tend to be larger so that they can better protect and copulate with emerging females. Smaller males are usually unable to compete as well, and so have to make the best out of a bad situation; thus, they become hoverers. Each group has a different set of behaviors. The patrollers move over a large space containing many other patrollers. Usually, patrollers will frequent the same spots over the course of their lives. Since the area is so large, the cost to defend it against other patrollers would be much greater than the potential mating benefits, so the patrollers show very little territoriality.[11] Patroller males will usually only fight when a breeding female is near. In contrast, each hoverer stakes out an area of about one meter in diameter. These areas don’t overlap with other hoverers. Any fast moving object (i.e. bee, dragonfly, leaf, etc.) that enters a territory will be quickly chased. The chase allows the male bee to determine if a female is unmated, or if an enemy male is in his territory. If it is a male bee, the territory owner will chase it out, but not beyond the boundary of the territory. What is interesting is that every day (or even every several hours) the territory holder will abandon the area to establish a new zone. Often the male will never return to the vacated area, and it will be taken over by another male. This shows that hoverers show a low site tendency but strong territoriality.[11] A balanced ratio of patrollers to hoverers is maintained, and thus, this ratio is an evolutionary stable strategy. If more males become patrollers, then the hoverers will benefit from the reduced competition, and the hoverers' genes will spread until the stable ratio is returned to. The same thing will happen if more males become hoverers.
Ces transactions, qu'elles concernent des biens neuf ou d'occasion, font intervenir des intermédiaires, tels que des entreprises (diagnostic immobilier, agence immobilière, société civile de placement immobilier, société civile immobilière, société foncière, etc.) ou des corps de métier (agent immobilier, expert, géomètre-expert, marchand de biens, négociateur immobilier, notaire, etc.).
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